The Chronicles of Horror Movie Night: ‘Deadline’ (1984)


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After starting in Washington D.C. nine years ago Horror Movie Night has expanded to include chapters in Austin, Dallas and Chicago. Horror’s Not Dead’s own Brian Kelley is the originator and programmer of this illustrious weekly Wednesday night tradition which features a “classic” horror film. Each week I will be reviewing/commenting on the past week’s selection so do your best to find the film, most of which have not made it past VHS, and follow along. Better yet, start your own chapter.

Paragon Video VHS of Deadline

There’s a cold front coming through the hallowed ground of Horror Movie Night. Make sure you have all provisions needed to sustain yourself for a brute attack on our senses. Gather the loved ones close, say your possible goodbyes, and make damn sure you are ready for whatever may come your way. An arctic chill blasts through our screens as yet another Canadian horror film comes into the rotation. EEK! Now this isn’t always bad, but I’ve found with most horror flicks from our neighbors to the north, at least those from the 70s and 80s, it’s kind of a hit or miss deal. There are some damn fine films out there, just look at Cronenberg, but there are also tons of time wasters. Sadly that’s kind of the case with this week’s pick, Deadline from 1984. Though it is overall a tad boring and too “talky,” there are a few moments of pure chaotic, bloody bliss. 

The Chronicles of Horror Movie Night: ‘Of Unknown Origin’ (1983)


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After starting in Washington D.C. nine years ago Horror Movie Night has expanded to include chapters in Austin, Dallas and Chicago. Horror’s Not Dead’s own Brian Kelley is the originator and programmer of this illustrious weekly Wednesday night tradition which features a “classic” horror film. Each week I will be reviewing/commenting on the past week’s selection so do your best to find the film, most of which have not made it past VHS, and follow along. Better yet, start your own chapter!

Rat Scratch Fever

Alright guys, this is going to be a rarity for my good ‘ol Horror Movie Night column. Over the past – however long you’ve been reading – you’ve seen me praise the ludicrous and gory, all the while condemning the low-body-count-plagued snoozefests. This week we have a film that has a body count of zero. Yep, not a single person bites the dust here, but I’m still going to sing the high praises of the 1983 film Of Unknown Origin. It is possible to have a horror film, or in this case a bit more of a thriller, with little to no death, yet be able to retain a feeling of terror and keep you interested while on the edge of your seat. Thanks to director George P. Cosmatos that is exactly what we get here. 

The Chronicles of Horror Movie Night: ‘Judgement Day’ (1988)


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After starting in Washington D.C. nine years ago Horror Movie Night has expanded to include chapters in Austin, Dallas and Chicago. Horror’s Not Dead’s own Brian Kelley is the originator and programmer of this illustrious weekly Wednesday night tradition which features a “classic” horror film. Each week I will be reviewing/commenting on the past week’s selection so do your best to find the film, most of which have not made it past VHS, and follow along. Better yet, start your own chapter!

Sweet UK cover of Judgement Day

This week’s Horror Movie Night selection is not that great, I’m going to warn you right off the bat. There’s a low death count and very little in the story that is truly enjoyable. We get two main characters who are the annoying stereotypical American tourists too good to listen to the locals and a confusing tale involving a devil-run town. This all probably contributes to why most people have not seen, or even heard of, the 1988 film by Ferde Grofé, Jr – Judgement Day (aka The Third Hand). Just silly.

The Chronicles of Horror Movie Night: ‘The Unnamable II: The Statement of Randolph Carter’ (1993)


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After starting in Washington D.C. nine years ago Horror Movie Night has expanded to include chapters in Austin, Dallas and Chicago. Horror’s Not Dead’s own Brian Kelley is the originator and programmer of this illustrious weekly Wednesday night tradition which features a “classic” horror film. Each week I will be reviewing/commenting on the past week’s selection so do your best to find the film, most of which have not made it past VHS, and follow along. Better yet, start your own chapter!

VHS Cover for Unnamable II

Two years ago, long before I started toiling away on these weekly columns, we watched a film called The Unnamable for Horror Movie Night. I tried to remember what it was about a couple weeks ago and, for the life of me, could not recall but the foggiest of possible plots. I knew it was a Lovecraft adaptation and involved college kids and shenanigans at an old, cursed house in the woods. But really, what late 80s horror film didn’t involve that combination? So I crept down into my extensive horror vault and retrieved a copy to re-watch. Immediately it all came flooding back to me. It was a great time to give this another viewing since it was time that HMN braved the sequel from 1993 with the lengthy title The Unnamable II: The Statement of Randolph Carter. This definitely improves upon some of its predecessor’s weaknesses, has fun, but still lacks something to propel it to greatness.

The Chronicles of Horror Movie Night: ‘A Night to Dismember’ (1983)


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After starting in Washington D.C. nine years ago Horror Movie Night has expanded to include chapters in Austin, Dallas and Chicago. Horror’s Not Dead’s own Brian Kelley is the originator and programmer of this illustrious weekly Wednesday night tradition which features a “classic” horror film. Each week I will be reviewing/commenting on the past week’s selection so do your best to find the film, most of which have not made it past VHS, and follow along. Better yet, start your own chapter!

DVD Cover

Holy hell, was this a special Horror Movie Night!

While I know the titles, and reputations, of many of Doris Whishman’s films, this was my first foray into her interesting brand of filmmaking. The majority of the woman’s flicks are centered around big-breasted ladies baring all onscreen. This includes the infamous Chesty Morgan. She had a reported 73FF bust – in case you didn’t know.

Now that you’ve had time to pick your jaw up from the floor we’ll get on to the film at hand…

Why would this purveyor of sexploitation goodness make it onto the roster for HMN? Well, she made two horror films in her illustrious career and the first was her answer to the slasher boom of the early 80s. In 1983 Doris set out to fill screens with blood and boobs with A Night to Dismember. She succeeded in this quest, as well as confusing the hell out of everyone who witnessed this brief feature.

The Chronicles of Horror Movie Night: ‘The Initiation’ (1984)


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After starting in Washington D.C. nine years ago Horror Movie Night has expanded to include chapters in Austin, Dallas and Chicago. Horror’s Not Dead’s own Brian Kelley is the originator and programmer of this illustrious weekly Wednesday night tradition which features a “classic” horror film. Each week I will be reviewing/commenting on the past week’s selection so do your best to find the film, most of which have not made it past VHS, and follow along. Better yet, start your own chapter!

VHS cover of The Initiation

Another week, another slasher flick. I don’t want to that to sound derogatory or anything because I love the genre. It’s just that lately the slashers I’ve seen have been lacking that thing which makes them great: gore. Luckily, I had already seen The Initiation a couple of times before and knew good things were on the horizon. This has all the good stuff – some blood and guts, nudity, cheese, red herrings – and packs them into and hour-and-a-half with some sexy Zuniga action and a soap opera flare.

The Chronicles of Horror Movie Night: ‘Microwave Massacre’ (1983)


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After starting in Washington D.C. nine years ago Horror Movie Night has expanded to include chapters in Austin, Dallas and Chicago. Horror’s Not Dead’s own Brian Kelley is the originator and programmer of this illustrious weekly Wednesday night tradition which features a “classic” horror film. Each week I will be reviewing/commenting on the past week’s selection so do your best to find the film, most of which have not made it past VHS, and follow along. Better yet, start your own chapter!

Some AMAZING Cover Art

Last year at HMN, we watched a small film from 1991 called The Refrigerator. In this rather interesting tale, we see a couple dealing with the fact that in their kitchen dwells a large old school white icebox that is, well, homicidal. This sentient appliance causes strange things to happen to those living in the apartment and eats anyone it can. As we sat down to watch this week’s entry, titled Microwave Massacre, I was plagued with glee. Who wouldn’t want more killer kitchen aids? Unfortunately this turned out to be more about someone using a microwave to cook his victims rather than the cooking instrument going rouge. Luckily, the film is plenty of fun, it’s short, and, at times, hilarious!

The Chronicles of Horror Movie Night: ‘The Runestone’ (1991)


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After starting in Washington D.C. nine years ago Horror Movie Night has expanded to include chapters in Austin, Dallas and Chicago. Horror’s Not Dead’s own Brian Kelley is the originator and programmer of this illustrious weekly Wednesday night tradition which features a “classic” horror film. Each week I will be reviewing/commenting on the past week’s selection so do your best to find the film, most of which have not made it past VHS, and follow along. Better yet, start your own chapter!

UK Cover Art for The Runestone

I knew next to nothing about this week’s Horror Movie Night pick when we sat down and pressed play. With a name like The Runestone I expected it to be stemming from the fantasy world in some form or fashion. Whenever I think of runes I think of people either playing Dungeons & Dragons or a Renaissance Faire – or both. Not really my cup of tea, but still I was to be trapped for the next 100 or so minutes. Luckily it isn’t too medieval for my tastes and there is a pretty bad ass monster. Sadly it is rather mediocre and drags on a bit too long.




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