Terror Tuesday Report: The Burning Moon (1997)


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Editor’s Note: Usually we like to post Terror Tuesday Reports on the Tuesday following the screening, but the overwhelming and intense insanity of THE BURNING MOON actually put our intrepid writer, Noah, into a blood coma. When he awoke, this post had somehow found its own way onto the site. Enjoy.

The Film

Terror Tuesday is a celebration of horror movies on 35mm film, so when our host Zack Carlson announced he was showing The Burning Moon it was a bit of a shock. This German movie was shot on video so it really only exists in a digital format. I missed the previous week’s showing, but apparently when announcing he was showing The Burning Moon, Carlson told people specifically not to come see it. Not only is it shot on video but it’s also such an extreme gut punch that they would just hate it. He probably said it much more cleverly than I (and this is why we love Zack), but you get the idea. Regardless, expectations were that the audience would be thin and there would be walk outs, so the movie was shown in the much smaller Alamo Ritz theater that only holds 70 people.

Terror Tuesday Report: Phantasm II


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***Editor’s Note: We are so thrilled to bring back our Terror Tuesday Report feature after a long hiatus.***

The Film

This Terror Tuesday treated us to a sequel to a film that I’ve heard is a Terror Tuesday favorite, directed by a horror cinephile’s favorite, Don Cascarelli. Don Cascarelli is a name that ranks high up on the list of favorite genre filmmakers amongst film nerds the world over. He’s been at the helm of every film of the Phantasm franchise, and that feat alone is extremely noteworthy with the way franchises routinely get handed to new directors, usually after one or two films. Don obviously takes great care in the stories that he writes, and it definitely shows with this weeks Terror Tuesday entry, Phantasm II.

Terror Tuesday Report: The Visitor


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The Film

Terror Tuesday host Zack Carlson has a brilliant way of building up the anticipation for the films we’re about to see. In this week’s Terror Tuesday, he told us a story of a director named Giulio Paradisi, a man who felt he had a unique film and didn’t want to be saddled with the stereotypes that had developed toward Italian horror directors. To combat against these stereotypes, he changed his name to Michael J. Paradise, a name worthy of even the sleaziest car salesman or, in this case, a very strange director.

Very loosely, the story is centered on an 8-year-old girl with telekinetic powers and then switches focus to the battle between good and evil. Katy is a unique child, carrying within her the power of Sateen, and her primary mission on earth is to carry this power forward, a task accomplished by convincing her mother Barbara to bear a similarly endowed male child with whom Katy would eventually mate with. Representing good is an old man who comes complete with his own theme music that sounds like something straight out of a Blaxploitation film. He’s been sent forth to Earth by Jesus, who lives in space and tells stories to children about the impending doom that Katy represents. Believe it or not it gets even crazier than that.

Terror Tuesday Report – A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors


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The Film

The Nightmare on Elm Street franchise has a long and storied history. The craziest thing about it being that a character, Freddy Kreuger, who originally started as a child murderer who was murdered by the Elm Street families, became an icon by the late 80s whom children looked up to and dressed up as during Halloween. Kids were buying Freddy action figures, calling into Freddy 900 numbers, and running around with razor claw gloves and Freddy masks. How did it get this far? There’s actually an amazing documentary that chronicles the history of A Nightmare on Elm Street called Never Sleep Again, which covers everything about the franchise and I highly recommend delving into it if you have any interest in the series. But even with nine movies under the franchise’s belt, one of the best of the series is A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors.

 

Kicking off with a young woman, Kristen, played by a very young Patricia Arquette, we find she’s stalked in her dreams by our dream monster, Freddy Kreuger. After Freddy makes it look like she attempted to slice her wrists, Kristen is sent to an asylum with several other teenagers who are all also terrorized in their dreams. What sets Dream Warriors apart from the first two entries, and even the series as a whole, is that Kristen has the ability to bring people into her dreams with her, a supernatural power that allows the teens to fight back inside their dreams.

Terror Tuesday Report: TerrorVision (1986)


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The Film

The Putterman’s are having a new satellite dish installed. Not just any satellite dish, mind you, this is the latest and greatest state-of-the-art piece of equipment requiring hours of painstaking installation and setup, not to mention a breadbox-sized remote full of buttons, dials and mini-satellites to operate. However, it turns out the hardware may be too advanced as it has managed to pick up an alien life form that had been converted to energy and blasted away from the planet Pluton as garbage. The creature has an insatiable appetite and begins to cause problems in the Putterman house, bouncing around room to room via TVs.

Terror Tuesday Report: Prison


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The Film

With Wyoming running out of space for its inmates, the decision to reopen the decrepit Wyoming State Penitentiary is made. Brought on to oversee the operation is the infamously hard-assed Warden Eaton Sharpe (Lane Smith) who had been, years earlier in 1956, a hard-assed guard around the time a prisoner named Charlie Forsythe was put to death in the prison’s electric chair. Against the protests from a plucky young prison board rep, Katherine Walker (Chelsea Field), Sharpe has a shipment of prisoners brought in who will be responsible for cleaning up the facility. Among the batch is Burke (Viggo Mortensen in one of his first film roles) who bears a striking resemblence to Forsythe. When the wall sealing the execution room is broken through, something evil is unleashed and prisoners begin dying in horrible ways and whatever-the-evil-is looks to be aiming for Warden Sharpe.

Terror Tuesday Report: The Baby (1973)


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The Film

Everyone has their personal creep-out zone.  For many, the mere sight of a friendly clown sends a cold shock straight down the spine.  For others, lifelike porcelain dolls might be just the trigger they need to draw their heart up firmly into their throat.  For me, there’s nothing more demonic, nothing more unspeakably unsettling than an adult baby.

I’m an open-minded dude, but there’s something profoundly wrong with a fully-formed adult who can’t function in life without pretending to be a giant baby in their spare time.  I can’t even begin to fathom the psychological damage at work to make a grown-up want to drink warm Simulac from a bottle and poop their pants again (and again).  Oftentimes when dealing with fetishes, the fixation comes from something that brings someone a great deal of comfort, and I can understand that concept, but can anyone actually remember being a baby?  Oftentimes, adult babies are like infantile drag queens — not content to just be pampered by a mommy figure, but acting out as some kind of Super Baby, seemingly determined to out-baby a real baby, complete with giant adult-sized bonnets and lots of “ga ga goo goo” talk.  They’re not like babies in a maternity ward; they’re like babies in a Warner Brothers cartoon.  Only, they’re adults.  Weird.

Terror Tuesday Report: The Stepfather (1987)


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The Film

The Stepfather opens with a calm but blood-covered man ritualistically removing his beard and showering. He swaps his glasses for contacts, packs a few belongings, and leaves his home walking without acknowledging the horror of what he has left behind laying on the floor and covering the walls and furniture. After stopping briefly and nonchalantly to pick up the morning paper from his lawn, he walks off to a new life.

Six months later, Jerry Blake (Terry O’Quinn) is living in a new home with his girlfriend, Susan (Shelley Hack), and Susan’s daughter Stephanie. While Susan is unable to see past Jerry’s meticulously crafted facade, Stephanie is (as stepchildren usually are) suspicious of Jerry. It is her watchful eye and snooping that start to pry at tiny cracks in Jerry’s psyche. When he realizes his struggle to maintain a wholesome family are in vain (again), he begins preparations to move on to a yet another fresh start which includes getting rid of the one he is going to leave behind.




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