Terror Tuesday Report: The Burning Moon (1997)


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Editor’s Note: Usually we like to post Terror Tuesday Reports on the Tuesday following the screening, but the overwhelming and intense insanity of THE BURNING MOON actually put our intrepid writer, Noah, into a blood coma. When he awoke, this post had somehow found its own way onto the site. Enjoy.

The Film

Terror Tuesday is a celebration of horror movies on 35mm film, so when our host Zack Carlson announced he was showing The Burning Moon it was a bit of a shock. This German movie was shot on video so it really only exists in a digital format. I missed the previous week’s showing, but apparently when announcing he was showing The Burning Moon, Carlson told people specifically not to come see it. Not only is it shot on video but it’s also such an extreme gut punch that they would just hate it. He probably said it much more cleverly than I (and this is why we love Zack), but you get the idea. Regardless, expectations were that the audience would be thin and there would be walk outs, so the movie was shown in the much smaller Alamo Ritz theater that only holds 70 people.

Terror Tuesday Report: Phantasm II


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***Editor’s Note: We are so thrilled to bring back our Terror Tuesday Report feature after a long hiatus.***

The Film

This Terror Tuesday treated us to a sequel to a film that I’ve heard is a Terror Tuesday favorite, directed by a horror cinephile’s favorite, Don Cascarelli. Don Cascarelli is a name that ranks high up on the list of favorite genre filmmakers amongst film nerds the world over. He’s been at the helm of every film of the Phantasm franchise, and that feat alone is extremely noteworthy with the way franchises routinely get handed to new directors, usually after one or two films. Don obviously takes great care in the stories that he writes, and it definitely shows with this weeks Terror Tuesday entry, Phantasm II.

Terror Tuesday Report: Fright Night Part II (1988)


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The Film

So, FRIGHT NIGHT PART II picks up right after the first film, with Charlie Brewster (William Ragsdale) changing his memories of the events in the first film (vampires move in next door) through therapy, and keeping an arm’s length relationship with TV horror host Peter Vincent (Roddy McDowall), who’s still convinced they killed vampires together a couple of years before.  Everything’s hunky-dory for approximately fifteen minutes of this sequel, until Julie Carmen shows up as Regine, with her entourage of monster movie weirdos (including audience favorite Jon Gries as a sleazy werewolf).

She’s got her sights set on Charlie, wanting to turn him into a vampire, for a reason that feels too obvious despite it being the film’s only surprise. Fright Night Part II is energetic and amiable enough, but it almost literally can’t find a good reason to exist.  Too light on both scares and comedy, the film mostly consists of Charlie sneaking around once again and peeking at vampires through windows, trying to convince the one character who shouldn’t need any convincing (Vincent) that the bloodsuckers are back.

Terror Tuesday Report: Deranged: Confessions of a Necrophile


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The Film

Edward Theodore Gein is one of the United States most notorious killers and disturbed human beings. With an actual body count of only 2 people, Gein was known for digging up graves of recently deceased women to fashion keepsakes from their skin and bones. And it’s this level of depravity that has given rise to the notoriety of this sick puppy which has spawned many of our horror movie icons. Leatherface from The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Normal Bates from Pyscho and Jame Gumb in The Silence of the Lambs are all based in some form or fashion on mister Gein. However, the most accurate depiction of his crimes comes in the form of the 1974 film Deranged: Confessions of a Necrophile, which was recently shown as our Terror Tuesday selection at the Alamo Drafthouse.

Terror Tuesday Report: The Exterminator


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The Film

Quite often at Terror Tuesday we sit down to watch a film that may not fit within the confines of traditional horror. This is one of those weeks as we sat down for cult favorite vigilante film The Exterminator. A favorite of Terror Tuesday host Zack Carlson, we were treated to a mini trivia contest in which he had a few copies of the new blu-ray release of this film to give away as prizes. That seemed to get the crowd properly fired up for the movie, which had a little bit of a later start than we’re accustomed to for Terror Tuesday. And if Zack’s intro didn’t get us in the proper mood, the soft rock stylings of Roger Bowling crooning a song called “Heal It” certainly did the trick.

Terror Tuesday Report: Don’t Panic


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Michael just turned seventeen, ain’t that great? He also just moved with his mom to Mexico City so that…also happened to him. His friends decide to throw him a surprise party (at the end of the party he was already having) and invite the girl with whom they know Michael is smitten. What a great opportunity, thinks the teen rabble, to drink and, less traditionally, play a round of Ouija. Unwittingly, because no one would ever accuse any of these putzes of having any wit, they release a demonic spirit called Virgil and spend the rest of the movie being offed in ways that feel very plagiarized familiar.

Terror Tuesday Report: Revenge From Planet Ape


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The Film

Revenge From Planet Ape isn’t very good, but not for the reasons you’re probably expecting. The title suggests that this 1971 Spanish film was made to capitalize on the gargantuan success of the Planet of the Apes series and that it’s just a lame rip-off cash-in good-for-nothin’ imitation of an American success. Nah, ripping off American films is the Italians‘ job. Revenge From Planet Ape is not the real title of this film — it was the third or fourth title, slapped on after the film had previously bombed two or three times under more accurate titles. Naturally, someone thought that tricking the American moviegoing public by making them think this Spanish zombie movie was a a Planet of the Apes was a fine plan indeed. And here we are.

Terror Tuesday Report: TerrorVision (1986)


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The Film

The Putterman’s are having a new satellite dish installed. Not just any satellite dish, mind you, this is the latest and greatest state-of-the-art piece of equipment requiring hours of painstaking installation and setup, not to mention a breadbox-sized remote full of buttons, dials and mini-satellites to operate. However, it turns out the hardware may be too advanced as it has managed to pick up an alien life form that had been converted to energy and blasted away from the planet Pluton as garbage. The creature has an insatiable appetite and begins to cause problems in the Putterman house, bouncing around room to room via TVs.




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