The Chronicles of Horror Movie Night: The Shaft (2001)


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After starting in Washington D.C. nine years ago Horror Movie Night has expanded to include chapters in Austin, Dallas and Chicago. Horror’s Not Dead’s own Brian Kelley is the originator and programmer of this illustrious weekly Wednesday night tradition which features a “classic” horror film. Each week I will be reviewing/commenting on the past week’s selection so do your best to find the film, most of which have not made it past VHS, and follow along. Better yet, start your own chapter!

Foreign DVD cover that is much cooler

Another year of bloody fun at Horror Movie Night has come to a fine finish. Just as 2011 began, it ends – with a flick about a killer elevator by Dick Maas. This fine Dutch director was chosen by our wise programmer, Brian, to bookend the year and we even had a couple of his other films thrown in along the way. I can’t remember every little instance of his original film De Lift (1983) from a year ago but I do recall enjoying it. According to my personal movie logging notes, as this was before starting the weekly HMN column, I enjoyed this even though it was a tad slow. Maybe Maas felt the same way, as he felt compelled to direct an English language remake set in New York City some eighteen years later. 2001’s The Shaft (aka Down) has pretty much all of the same faults and successes as the original but it’s still a fun vertical ride.

The Chronicles of Horror Movie Night: Sint (2010)


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After starting in Washington D.C. nine years ago Horror Movie Night has expanded to include chapters in Austin, Dallas and Chicago. Horror’s Not Dead’s own Brian Kelley is the originator and programmer of this illustrious weekly Wednesday night tradition which features a “classic” horror film. Each week I will be reviewing/commenting on the past week’s selection so do your best to find the film, most of which have not made it past VHS, and follow along. Better yet, start your own chapter!

US DVD Cover

There’s nothing like taking a beloved children’s character and perverting it for use in a horror film. It just makes me smile ear-to-ear. You can do it with numerous personalities, fictional or real, but the one that is most famous and terrifying has to be Santa Claus. A child puts his trust in Kringle more than any other person on the planet. He will tell a man dressed as the jolly old elf at a shopping mall more than he will tell his own parents. When you take that trust and flip it to where this figure of gift giving and love becomes a homicidal maniac, you are set to warp some minds.




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