Pandora’s Box: ‘Bloody Reunion’ (2006)


Posted by:

Pandora’s Box is an advisory column in which I watch a film based solely on its cover art, or box if you will, and determine whether or not it’s worth your time when you’re perusing the horror section of Instant Netflix. I do no research and watch no trailers, these films are completely and 100% unknown to me. You shouldn’t judge books by their covers, but I intend to do so with these movies. Will I uncover a glimmer of hope for my strange viewing habits or utter despair? We won’t know until I open…Pandora’s Box.

 

What Grabbed Me

A film that a lot of the staff hasn’t seen for a while and will hopefully one day soon see again is The Loved Ones, based on the premise of a high school girl who kidnaps boys she’s interested in and hosts a prom in her home while torturing them. A film called Bloody Reunion with a handcuffed kid strapped to a wooden chair conjured up some of the memories I had of The Loved Ones. Those were my thoughts about the art that grabbed me. The art of the box itself is just kinda cool and has an aura of dementedness to the type of violence that ensued before and after she was strapped to that chair. Plus it’s an Asian film, so you know there will be violence and blood out of every place it can come out of. At least I think/hope so.

Pandora’s Box: ‘Wolf Town’ (2010)


Posted by:

Pandora’s Box is an advisory column in which I watch a film based solely on its cover art, or box if you will, and determine whether or not it’s worth your time when you’re perusing the horror section of Instant Netflix. I do no research and watch no trailers, these films are completely and 100% unknown to me. You shouldn’t judge books by their covers, but I intend to do so with these movies. Will I uncover a glimmer of hope for my strange viewing habits or utter despair? We won’t know until I open…Pandora’s Box.

 

What Grabbed Me

Admittedly, not great cover art, and contrary to the principle of this column, I did know a tiny bit about the film. That tiny bit of information came during a viewing of ATM in which a freind of mine mentioned that this film has a similar plot: a group of people trapped in one place with a predator waiting in the wings on the outside. In this case though, obviously the awaiting predators were wolves, which is pretty damn cool. Judging a book by it’s cover the way I do though, I was tempted to not cover this one because of how shoddy the art is.

Pandora’s Box: Boot Camp (2008)


Posted by:

Pandora’s Box is an advisory column in which I watch a film based solely on its cover art, or box if you will, and determine whether or not it’s worth your time when you’re perusing the horror section of Instant Netflix. I do no research and watch no trailers, these films are completely and 100% unknown to me. You shouldn’t judge books by their covers, but I intend to do so with these movies. Will I uncover a glimmer of hope for my strange viewing habits or utter despair? We won’t know until I open…Pandora’s Box.

What Grabbed Me

First and foremost it was Mila Kunis, because seriously, I’m only a man. The cover also has one of the buzzwords that is meant to instantly generate interest among horror fans: UNRATED. The cover indicates that some horrible trouble-making teenagers get sent to a boot camp in which horrifying things go down and they deservedly get their comeuppance.

Terror Tuesday Report: Phantasm II


Posted by:

***Editor’s Note: We are so thrilled to bring back our Terror Tuesday Report feature after a long hiatus.***

The Film

This Terror Tuesday treated us to a sequel to a film that I’ve heard is a Terror Tuesday favorite, directed by a horror cinephile’s favorite, Don Cascarelli. Don Cascarelli is a name that ranks high up on the list of favorite genre filmmakers amongst film nerds the world over. He’s been at the helm of every film of the Phantasm franchise, and that feat alone is extremely noteworthy with the way franchises routinely get handed to new directors, usually after one or two films. Don obviously takes great care in the stories that he writes, and it definitely shows with this weeks Terror Tuesday entry, Phantasm II.

Halloween White Elephant: Shutter (2004)


Posted by:

Jump scares may be cheap, and often times they only serve to cheapen the experience of a given film. It’s always a pleasant surprise when you come across an exception to that rule. In the case of Shutter, it was both a pleasant surprise and at times an absolutely fucking terrifying experience. What is actually a pretty straight-forward story is executed with amazing precision and gives the film a brilliant intensity. When combined with absolutely chilling makeup effects and a creepy score, all of that adds up to a great horror movie. It also is now responsible for my not wanting to take a picture of anything. Ever.

Halloween White Elephant: Cemetery Man (1994)


Posted by:

From Peter Hall–“Quite simply one of the best horror movies of the ’90s.  Sure, it’s not a straight scary movie, but it has a whimsical sense of the macabre that is impossible to not fall in love with.  Style aside, it’s also just a very unique zombie film that doesn’t treat the undead like an abominable plague, but more like a comedic pestilence that one poor schlub has to deal with.”

A funny story about this White Elephant series and Peter’s assignment of this film to me is that Cemetery Man has been assigned to me before. Well, not really assigned, but our very own Brian Kelley very generously lent me his out-of-print DVD as a recommended companion piece to Dylan Dog: Dead of Night when it was released in theaters. I don’t know if it would have made Dylan Dog any better (probably not), but now that I’ve finally gotten the chance to see it, I’m even more grateful for this series as it has exposed me to a uniquely fantastic film in Cemetery Man aka Dellamorte Dellamore.

Terror Tuesday Report: The Exterminator


Posted by:

The Film

Quite often at Terror Tuesday we sit down to watch a film that may not fit within the confines of traditional horror. This is one of those weeks as we sat down for cult favorite vigilante film The Exterminator. A favorite of Terror Tuesday host Zack Carlson, we were treated to a mini trivia contest in which he had a few copies of the new blu-ray release of this film to give away as prizes. That seemed to get the crowd properly fired up for the movie, which had a little bit of a later start than we’re accustomed to for Terror Tuesday. And if Zack’s intro didn’t get us in the proper mood, the soft rock stylings of Roger Bowling crooning a song called “Heal It” certainly did the trick.

Terror Tuesday Report: The Visitor


Posted by:

The Film

Terror Tuesday host Zack Carlson has a brilliant way of building up the anticipation for the films we’re about to see. In this week’s Terror Tuesday, he told us a story of a director named Giulio Paradisi, a man who felt he had a unique film and didn’t want to be saddled with the stereotypes that had developed toward Italian horror directors. To combat against these stereotypes, he changed his name to Michael J. Paradise, a name worthy of even the sleaziest car salesman or, in this case, a very strange director.

Very loosely, the story is centered on an 8-year-old girl with telekinetic powers and then switches focus to the battle between good and evil. Katy is a unique child, carrying within her the power of Sateen, and her primary mission on earth is to carry this power forward, a task accomplished by convincing her mother Barbara to bear a similarly endowed male child with whom Katy would eventually mate with. Representing good is an old man who comes complete with his own theme music that sounds like something straight out of a Blaxploitation film. He’s been sent forth to Earth by Jesus, who lives in space and tells stories to children about the impending doom that Katy represents. Believe it or not it gets even crazier than that.




Recent Comments